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Three Things They Don't Teach You About Change Leadership (Forbes)

Often it is not so much that the planning for change is incorrect, as it is that the impetus for change is slowed, either by forces that resist change or are indifferent to an initiative, or by an insufficient motive force inside the leadership team to push the initiative forward in the face of hesitation. This is leadership failure, not management failure, and is often associated with three leadership requirements that we frequently see missing in discussions of big change efforts:

  1. You need to be immodest
  2. You need to be impolite
  3. You need to be unreasonable.

Read more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/billfischer/2014/10/13/three-things-they-dont-teach-you-about-change-leadership/#3b58e7403dab

Are You An Analog or A Digital Leader? (with Abhijit Bhaduri, Forbes)

Changing mindsets begins with you! The only mind you can be sure of changing is your own, and the only way that you can demonstrate this mindset change is through your behaviors. If you aspire for your organization to be faster, more innovative, less afraid of failure, it has to begin by you being faster, more involved in innovation and being willing to be the failure role-model. If you won’t try it, why should anyone else who works for you?  Read more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/billfischer/2015/03/19/are-you-an-analog-or-digital-leader/#6fdee8122782

The End of Expertise (HBR.org)

What if what you know didn’t matter anymore? What if knowledge became a commodity? What if everyone could be an expert?

Far-fetched, you think? Well, in fact, the “what if” is no longer speculative; it is here already. Talk to people in such professional service industries as private banking, auditing, consulting, even engineering, and you begin to hear concerns about the commoditization of professional knowledge.

Read more: https://hbr.org/2015/10/the-end-of-expertise

Fighting Ebola Means Managing Fear (with William A.Fischer II, HBR.org)

One reason why it has been so difficult to tackle the Ebola crisis is fear, which prevents healthcare workers from grappling effectively with the situation. Fear can hobble an organization; for instance, recent research shows that at Nokia, fear led to paralysis, isolating the headquarters from the marketplace and rendering it unable to respond to a fast-changing situation.

The younger of us, a pulmonary and critical care physician, just returned from the Ebola outbreak’s epicenter in Guinea, where he was deployed by WHO to treat victims of the disease. The elder, a management teacher, studies how organizations react under conditions of uncertainty and fear.

We recently compared notes, and identified four practices seen in the fight against Ebola that have been particularly effective in managing uncertainty and fear.

Read more: https://hbr.org/2014/10/fighting-ebola-means-managing-fear

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    “what he communicated caused racists to rejoice, minorities to weep, and the vast heart of America to mourn” https://t.co/8Zc21eS39a

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    "In theater, two people see a different show --they fill the blank spaces differently. That’s what we’re here for" https://t.co/K0QiKcuVVX

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    “I’m sick of hearing you talking about flops.. some of yr successes R flops & some of your failures have been hits.” https://t.co/K0QiKcMxkx

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    Forget "new" space: these NASA engineers are real explorers in a world that has lost its curiosity https://t.co/Y9xlmukRA1

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    "old space": end of an era of space exploration in which the main goal is observation rather than commercialization. https://t.co/Y9xlmuCsrz